Tag Archives: Girls with Slingshots

Superpurrsition

Diesel Sweeties by Richard Stevens 3 (CC BY-NC 2.5)

Diesel Sweeties by Richard Stevens 3 (CC BY-NC 2.5)

There are comics that are card-carrying “science comics” that teach science (egBoxplot by Maki Naro) and express truths about the experience of being a scientist (egPiled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham). There are those that are super-nerdy all the time, like xkcd by Randall Munroe.

Then there are the comics that occasionally brush up against the scientific world – dropping a punchline that hints at larger concepts, drawing in those who understand and inviting inquiry from those who don’t. This strip from Diesel Sweeties by Richard Stevens 3 is part of that tradition.

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“…baking IS science”

Editor’s Note: A strip from Danielle Corsetto’s Girls with Slingshots reminded us of Ben’s inaugural post here at The Finch & Pea. Excerpt from post originally published 30 August 2012.

Adapted from "Girls with Slingshots #1882" by Danielle Corsetto (All Rights Reserved - Adapted & Used with Permission)

Adapted from “Girls with Slingshots #1882” by Danielle Corsetto (All Rights Reserved – Adapted & Used with Permission)

Good food, sexy food is the result of passion and science. We talk a lot about passion in cooking, but passion alone can’t make a chocolate mousse cake. Passion can’t ensure efficient heat transfer, make proteins bind, crystallize molecules, or drive chemical reactions. There is science in your food, even if you don’t know how it got there.

I’m here to introduce you, the patrons of The Finch & Pea, to some delicious nosh, to stoke your passion for cooking, and to help you understand how cooking works.

Understanding the science behind a recipe – what the ingredients really are, how they interact with each other, how they change when you manipulate them – will make you a better cook, chef, and diner. When I go to write a cake recipe, knowing flour type composition, hydration ratios, chemical reactions of leavening agents, and methods for strengthen emulsions drastically affects the success of the recipe. Cooking isn’t just about passion. It’s about words you heard in chemistry and physics class. Words like heat conductivity, melting point, vaporization temperatures, phase transition, pressure effects on physical states, hygroscopic minerals, and density differentials all play an important role in almost every aspect of cooking.

Together we are going to explore the science behind everyday cooking. Why should you salt a steak an hour before cooking, but never right before? Why shouldn’t you use vanilla extract? How can baking soda ruin your cookies? How does granulated sugar “cook” your strawberries when poured over top?

Slingshot Across America

Girls with Slingshots by Danielle Corsetto is one of my favorite comics. You can and should go see and support her on the “Slingshot Across America Tour”. Don’t make me judge you.

Danielle Corsetto

Danielle was also cool enough to let us use a bit of one of her comics, in which she made a mitosis joke out of boobs (she also did not believe we could make the bit we used SFW).

Sometimes, “Girls with Slingshots” is a science comic…

Girls with Slingshots #358 by Danielle Corsetto (All Rights Reserved - Used & Adapted with Permission)

Girls with Slingshots #358 by Danielle Corsetto (All Rights Reserved – Used & Adapted with Permission)

This one goes back to November 2007, but I recently rediscovered a lovely bit of science humor and art from Danielle Corsetto in her wonderful comic strip Girls with Slingshots. As an added bonus, note that Hazel wins for “Most Sophisticated” costume, not “Nerdiest”.

The actual strip feature no real nudity, but, if your workplace or conservative christian dominated place of residence objects to pseudo-nudity, you may want click through in a private location.*

You can follow Danielle on Twitter.

*Girls with Slingshots is very funny, poignant, and has strong sexual themes. So, some employers may not want you browsing there on your work computer