Both these drawings are better than my drawings of a whale

Kiddie Arts by Telmo Pieper (All Rights Reserved; Used with Permission)

There are two things that I love about digital artist Telmo Pieper recreating drawings from childhood. One is that the images are beautiful and fantastically odd in the uninhibited way children capture so well. The second is that Pieper’s childhood drawings look like any other kid’s drawings (or my drawings as an adult). Continue reading “Both these drawings are better than my drawings of a whale”

Whale watching near Tadoussac

Zodiac boat
Zodiac boat

When the weather is warm enough – between May and October – whales will swim from the North Atlantic into the Gulf of St Lawrence, and upstream into the St Lawrence river. They get about as far as Tadoussac. At this point, the river is still very wide. Wide enough even for blue whales.

When it gets colder, the whales return to the ocean, but from May until October, Tadoussac is host to whales – and several companies stationed there organise whale watching trips.

I started a 4-month lab project in Quebec City in October 2000, so at the very end of whale season some other Dutch students and I went on a day trip to Tadoussac. Continue reading “Whale watching near Tadoussac”

Cambridge University Museum of Zoology

Finback Whale Skeleton outside the Cambridge University Museum of Zoology - 2.5yo child for scale (Photo by Josh Witten - All Rights Reserved)
Finback Whale Skeleton outside the Cambridge University Museum of Zoology – 2.5yo child for scale (Photo by Josh Witten – All Rights Reserved)

For being a relatively small town, Cambridge, England, has a lot of museums. I already showed you the Sedgwick and the Cambridge Science Centre. Today we’re visiting the Museum of Zoology.

The museum is hidden in a densely built courtyard, behind lecture halls and other buildings. You know you’ve found it when you spot the whale skeleton.

Inside, the museum has more skeletons, but these are a bit smaller than the whale outside. Continue reading “Cambridge University Museum of Zoology”