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There are those groups where you keep wondering why they let you in. I’m not talking about impostor syndrome (I went to graduate school – I know that of which I speak), but the kind of group where you are pretty sure folks know exactly who/what you are and they let you stick around anyway. Maybe it was an older sibling letting you tag along when you were younger. Maybe it was a pick-up basketball team that doesn’t care about your lousy jump shot. Maybe it is your life partner.

If we exclude my partner (what was she thinking?), my “that group” is Science for the People*. Starting in 2010, I gradually migrated from fan, to brief guest, to occasional source of information, to official team member. I still maintain that I have the easiest job on the crew.

That is why I’m so pleased that we have launched the Science for the People Patreon CampaignScience for the People has been a labor of love by the entire team for years. The Patreon Campaign is designed to make it possible for those that labor the hardest on producing Science for the People can keep producing the best science podcast** you can find.

*Here, I am in the position to make people put up with me, the poor bastards.
**Conflict of interest disclosure.

Science for the People: Eye of the Beholder

sftpThis week, we’re learning about the history of optics, and how our perception of the world and how we see it underwent a radical transformation in 17th-century Holland. We’ll spend the hour with historian, philosopher, and science writer Laura J. Snyder, talking about her book Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek and the Reinvention of Seeing.

Science for the People is now on Patreon, and is accepting your support and donations! Visit the Patreon page to get more information about how it works, and learn about the extra content you can access as a monthly supporter! You can also find out what other ways you can support the show, or visit our bookshelf.

*Josh provides research help to Science for the People and is, therefore, completely biased.