Movie Food: The Sword in the Stone

“The Sword in the Stone” – Walt Disney Company (Fair Use; via http://deliciouscartoonfood.tumblr.com/)

Editor’s Note: My favorite movie food is Dots. That is not the kind of movie food Ben is talking about here.

In the Disney film The Sword in the Stone, Arthur’s stepbrother, Sir Kay, devours approximately 5 pounds of chicken drumsticks by simply sticking the whole drumstick in his mouth and sucking off the meat. My young mind was astonished to learn that you could eat an entire drumstick in one bite. Turns out, you can’t. There’s all this cartilage and stuff in there and its a bit of a choking hazard. Bummer.

You can, however, sometimes pull off Sir Kay’s trick with the meat on the radius* bone when eating buffalo wings. It’s not nearly as impressive, but still oddly satisfying.

*You know the part of a chicken wing that has two bones in it? I’m pretty sure that the radius is the smaller bone in that portion of the wing. It also has less cartilage and connective tissue, which helps with this particular trick.

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3 responses to “Movie Food: The Sword in the Stone

  1. Olias of Sunhillow

    I guess I’d always assumed that Kay was eating turkey legs, similar to the ones served at most Renaissance festivals. Having been a vegetarian for 20 years, however, I don’t feel qualified to discuss the relative levels of sinew in chicken legs vs. turkey.

    • I suppose that he could be eating turkey legs. That would indeed be very Renaissance Festivalish and seem appropriately Disney. My two thought on that however are: 1) turkeys and chickens have pretty similar anatomy, so all the same connective tissue issues would exist, and 2) Kay would have to have an impressively large mouth to fit a whole turkey leg in…those things are huge. Kind of hope now that they were turkey legs because that make the feat even more amazing.

      • I have a vague and perhaps incorrect recollection that Sir Kay tosses the spent bones to a dog(s) and that the bones are not instantly destroyed. This might suggest that the meat in question (all appearances to the contrary) is pork or beef or mutton.

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