Tag Archives: Podcast

Science for the People: Coffee Table Science

sftpThis week, Science for the People meets the authors of three big books that use stunning images to tell intriguing stories about the history of science. We’ll discuss evolution and the building of the fossil record with invertebrate palaeontologist Paul Taylor, author of A History of Life in 100 Fossils. Archivist Julie Halls shares stories of unheralded ingenuity from her book Inventions that Didn’t Change the World. We will also learn about attempts to map the world in three dimensions from independent conservator Sylvia Sumira, author of Globes: 400 Years of Exploration, Navigation, and Power.

*Josh provides research help to Science for the People and is, therefore, completely biased.

Science for the People: Birth of the Pill [Rebroadcast]

sftpThis Science for the People is exploring the intersection of science, society, and sex with the origin story of the birth control pill. They speak to author Jonathan Eig about his book The Birth of the Pill: How Four Crusaders Reinvented Sex and Launched a Revolution. Writer Rose Eveleth also returns to talk about the history and design of the vaginal speculum.

*Josh provides research help to Science for the People and is, therefore, completely biased.

Science for the People: Animal Weapons

sftpThis week, Science for the People is talking about weapons: both the ones that evolve in nature, and those created by humanity. We’ll talk about the arms races that spur the development of horns and claws, warships and nuclear weapons, with Doug Emlen, Professor in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of Montana, and author of Animal Weapons: The Evolution of Battle.

*Josh provides research help to Science for the People and is, therefore, completely biased.

People’s Republic of Science

sftpNo one does the long form science interview like Science for the People does the long form science interview*. If you have time to listen to Science for the People, then you have time to complete the mere ten questions that make up the Science for the People Listener Survey (if you want, you can save time by skipping the credits where they say I am marginally useful).

Think of it as your civic obligation to keep great science programming coming at your earholes – like voting, except that here your opinion actually matters.

*Probabilistically speaking, this is quite likely to be literally true.

Science for the People: Coal Wars

sftp51bIOEq1xuL._SL250_ (1)This week Science for the People is learning more about the fossil fuel that powered humanity’s first industrial age, and helpedset us on a course for a looming climate crisis. We’ll speak to Richard Martin, energy editor at the MIT Technology Review, about his book Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet. We’ll also explore the environmental impact of coal with Jeff Deyette, assistant director of energy research in the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

*Josh provides research & social media help to Science for the People and is, therefore, completely biased.