Tag Archives: Linkonomicon

The Mobiest of Dicks

I know that title doesn’t sound right…or does it.

Thanks to a tweet by Jimmy Stamp that was retweeted by Alexis Madrigal, I found this delightful post by Robin Sloan entitled “The Moby Dick Variations” that speculates about what it means to be a novel as a unique work of art. In the post, Sloan investigates how a novel can vary and still maintain its identity. The post instantly connected to two divergent thoughts in my brain. Continue reading

On the underrepresentation of cheese in literature…

GK Chesterton expounds on the poetic nature of cheese and condemns its notable absence from poetry. The essay is well worth reading, and I a particularly endorse this line with the proviso that it is applicable to man, woman, or child*:

…nor can I imagine why a man should want more than bread and cheese, if he can get enough of it.
-GK Chesterton

*My four and five-year olds are extremely fond of Stilton, which is how we know they are mine.

Hat tip to Steve Silberman.

Bang for Our Buck in Research

In his weekly column at Pacific Standard, our Mike White discusses the importance of basic science for productive science:

…Congress wants to know: Are we getting the most out of our research dollars?…the National Academy of Sciences…came back with its answer…If you care about the economic returns of research, don’t focus too much on the economic returns of research. Focus instead on cultivating a world-class basic research community, and the economic returns will come.
-Mike White

Both these drawings are better than my drawings of a whale

Kiddie Arts by Telmo Pieper (All Rights Reserved; Used with Permission)

There are two things that I love about digital artist Telmo Pieper recreating drawings from childhood. One is that the images are beautiful and fantastically odd in the uninhibited way children capture so well. The second is that Pieper’s childhood drawings look like any other kid’s drawings (or my drawings as an adult). Continue reading

A LEGO Odyssey

Some stories are so good they can inspire us for thousands of years, which is good news for those of us who need, NEED, to see Homer’s Odyssey captured in LEGO bricks, which have only existed since 1949.

*Hat tip to The Brothers Brick.