Category Archives: The Art of Science

Mammoth ain’t Mopey

I am very pleased to announce that the Mammoth is Mopey project of Jennie & David Orr passed its $104 funding goal on IndieGoGo last night. Personally, this means my kids will be getting a copy of this beautiful and inspiring book, one of our local libraries will be getting a copy of this beautiful and inspiring book, and that I will also be able to show my love for ankylosaurs on my messenger bag with a cool “Paleontology Fancier*” button.

Mammoth is Mopey by Jennie & David Orr (All Rights Reserved; Adapted with Permission)

It also means that you have one week left to pledge your support in the confidence that any pledge is actually a pre-order. You can get a print copy for only $15. My fellow parents know that $15 is actually a pretty good deal for an illustrated book that about which you are enthusiastic – and, if you are not enthusiastic about reading, art, and prehistoric animals, I really don’t know what you are doing here.

You can still take the “Which Mammoth is Mopey Character are You” quiz too. I got the artistic ankylosaur, which I think confirms the accuracy of the quiz beyond any shadow of doubt.

Ankylosaur is Artistic by Jennie & David Orr (All Rights Reserved; Used with Permission)

*More like fanciest – am I right?

Art of Science: Juan Travieso Paints Endangered Species

Juan Travieso, Extinction is Eternal, Acrylic on Canvas, 2013

Juan Travieso, Extinction is Eternal, Acrylic on Canvas, 2013

Earth Day seems like the perfect moment to showcase the work of Juan Travieso, a Cuban-born painter based in Miami. Travieso’s oil and acrylic paintings feature endangered species, particularly a vast array of endangered birds, juxtaposed against design elements that suggest encroaching buildings, technology, and disease – in other words, some of the things that endanger them.

In a recent interview with the art blog Hi-Fructose, Travieso explained his inspiration. “As a part of nature, I am aware of the fact that we are trying so hard as a species to disconnect ourselves from what we are. I feel that it is my responsibility as an artist and as a citizen of the world to give voice to the powerless species on this earth. Therefore, I have been focusing on endangered species for the last six years. One of my goals is to paint all of the endangered birds in the world.”

The ambitious scale of that goal is part of the point. Travieso notes that after two years of painting endangered birds, he realized that the message of the paintings would be magnified by their sheer number.  “The more different species I painted, the more the audience would understand the great value of their loss. One of my dreams is to have a retrospective with all of my bird paintings under the same roof. It would be a grand statement on the toll we have taken on nature.”

You can read the full interview here  and see the full Endangered Birds series at Travieso’s website.

Foxy Lego

Turns out “Foxy Lego” totally works as a lyric substitute in the Jimi Hendrix song. Of course, nothing else in the song will make sense, but, really, that is a small price to pay in the face of this fox build by Bangoo H. As I have said before, I find myself particularly compelled by Lego art that represents biology, because both are composed of smaller component parts that individually capture almost none of the essence of the complete thing. I also like sculpture, using any medium, that captures the concept of dynamic motion. This fox checks all those boxes for me.

"Fox" by Bangoo H (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

“Fox” by Bangoo H (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

HT: Brothers Brick

The Analytical Engine, Plan 25

"The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage" by Sydney PaduaMy copy of Sydney Padua’s The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage is supposed to arrive next week (21 April 2015). I’m a little excited. As regular patrons of The Finch & Pea know, I’m just a little bit of a fan of her work*.

Until then (or until the copy you just ordered arrives), you contemplate the complexity and beauty of the completed analytical engine (if only in Padua’s imagination) at The Guardian.  You can also read about the development of the illustration and the choice of color palette at Padua’s own site.

*Mutual appreciation society

Having “Visions” at the Art Access Gallery

inkretina

Retina Diagram, ink and water on yupo, 2015 by Michele Banks (All Rights Reserved; Used with Permission)

The Art Access Gallery in Salt Lake City, Utah has collaborated with the Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah to present Visions from 17 April to 6 May, 2015 with an opening reception on 17 April (6-9PM). Visions blends the art and science of vision. The exhibit also had the good sense to include the work of our own Michele Banks, who has graciously provided us with a preview of her art.

Blue Batik Retinal Neuron, watercolor on paper, 2015 (All Rights Reserved; Used with Permission)

Blue Batik Retinal Neuron, watercolor on paper, 2015 (All Rights Reserved; Used with Permission)

The exhibit also includes the work of James Anderson, Nico Cuenca, Jim Gillman, Bryan Jones, Helga Kolb, Gabe Luna, Paula Morris, Hope Morrison, Scott Peterson, Rebecca Pfeiffer, Stuart Stansbusry, and Peter Westonscow.