Tag Archives: science art

The Art of Science: Density Fluctuations

Crustacean 11

Ellyn Weiss, Unidentified Specimen, Wax and Pigment

Concepts of time and change center the work of three artists in a show entitled Density Fluctuations that opened yesterday at the American Center for Physics in College Park, MD. The exhibition features work inspired by physics and biology by Shanthi Chandrasekar, Stephen Schiff and Ellyn Weiss in a variety of media. Chandrasekar, who studied physics before becoming a painter, explores the differences in the understanding of time as expressed in science and myth. Stephen Schiff morphs photographs, starting with images of nature and multiplying them and reconfiguring them like cells to create new, complex geometries. Ellyn Weiss uses layers of wax and pigment to create her imagined versions of creatures discovered by science as layers of ice melt. The intriguing shapes of her sculptures hint at unknown species of animals or strange mineral deposits. Together, the work of these three beguiling artists in approaching such heady topics is sure to provide plenty of food for thought.

Density Fluctuations is on display at the American Center for Physics until April 2015. More information is here.

Shanthi Chandrasekar, Chakra-Neer, Acrylic on Canvas

Shanthi Chandrasekar, Chakra-Neer, Acrylic on Canvas

The Art of Science: Scenes from the Deep, Distant Past

Alison Carey, Ordovician Period, 440-500 Mya, 2005

Alison Carey, Ordovician Period, 440-500 Mya, 2005

Alison Carey’s photographs of “Organic Remains of a Former World” are among the standouts of the current show at the National Academies of Science, Imagining Deep Time.  Carey uses a mix of sculpture, installation and photography to conjure up visions of ancient marine environments from each of the seven periods in the Paleozoic era.

To call these pieces small, murky and brownish would be accurate, but would barely hint at their evocative power and beauty.  Carey uses scientific data about the different periods and consults illustrations of their flora and fauna. The artist says that she was searching for uncharted territories in an era where little of the globe remains unexplored.

“In my search for a location that has not been photographed, I look to the Earth’s ancient past, a world that existed millions of years ago. I am drawn to this space because it is absent from human recollection and experience. Through my photographs, I offer the viewer a glimpse into a primitive landscape that has since been eroded or erased.”

Carey sculpts her creatures and rock formations out of clay, fires them and then submerges them  in the water of multiple 55-gallon aquariums. She then photographs them in her studio using a large format view camera, and prints them as contemporary ambrotypes using 9 x 23” black glass that she hand-coats with silver gelatin emulsion.

She adds that “the organic nature of this process adds to the rendition of these watery scenes by the serendipitous appearance of bubbles, streaks and obliterated areas of darkness.”

If you can’t make it to Imagining Deep Time (on view at the NAS in Washington, DC until January 15, 2015), you can see more of Alison Carey’s work at her website.

 

 

Art in Situ

photo (12)photo (9)We were rehanging some of our art from Michele Banks today. The first is on a wall in our family room. The second is on the wall of our downstairs, guest bathroom, which we just repainted.

Where is yours? You do have some “Artologica” Art, don’t you?

If not, go here as quickly as possible to correct that situation.

The Art of Science: Both Sides of the Cloud

Yuriko Yamaguchi, Cloud, 2014 (detail)

Yuriko Yamaguchi, Cloud, 2014 (detail)

Yuriko Yamaguchi’s ethereal sculptures are mostly made of wire and resin, but she has also included LED lights, wood, minerals, and bits of electronics. Reminiscent of organic shapes such as clouds, swarms, and neural networks, they symbolize the interconnectedness of all human and organic systems.

Yamaguchi says that her work was influenced by the work of physicist and systems theorist Fritjof Capra, whose book “The Web of Life” explored the tension between the part and the whole in many different systems.

The artist described one of her recent sculptures rather poetically:  “Creative energy is in a way like rain that comes down from the sky when the accumulated humidity can no longer remain suspended in the air and drops to the earth.”

The cloudlike form refers not only to atmospheric phenomena but to the modern, technological meaning of “the cloud”, emphasizing Yamaguchi’s belief that science, nature and technology are intimately intertwined.

Several pieces of her recent work are on display in “Interconnected: Science, Nature, and Technologies” at the Adamson Gallery in Washington, DC through August 31.

You can see more of her work on her website.

 

The Art of Science: Summer of SciArt

from Modular Systems (2012) by Laura Splan, on display at SciArt Center

from Modular Systems (2012) by Laura Splan, on display at SciArt Center

As art inspired by science gains in popularity, new spaces are springing up to showcase it. Europe had a head start, with London’s GV Art and Dublin’s Science Gallery, but now the US is catching up, with the opening of the Art.Science.Gallery in Austin, Texas, last year and SciArt Center in New York City this week.

For its inaugural exhibition, opening on Friday, June 20, SciArt Center has chosen the theme “What Lies Beneath,” as interpreted by artists Daniel Hill, Steve Miller, Jonathon Wells, Laura Splan, Jim Toia, and Jonathan Feldschuh. The exhibition runs through July 5 at the new gallery space on the Lower East Side.

Art.Science.Gallery currently has a group show called “Year of the Salamander” on display through June 21, featuring salamander-inspired artwork by a number of artists including Ele Willoughby, featured here before.  Upcoming events include the Tesla Project on July 5, a day-long celebration of everyone’s favorite eccentric genius.

In Washington, DC, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) plays host to “Gedankenexperiment”, a show by 24 members of the Washington Sculptors Group.  The work in the show, which runs from June 16 through August 22, is inspired by scientific and mathematical theories, hypotheses, and principles from Archimedes, I Ching, geology, geometry, architecture, and others.  An opening reception and artist talk will be held on Friday, June 20, from 6-9 pm.