Remembering the Sedgwick Museum

"Velociraptor" by Bangooh (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

“Velociraptor” by Bangooh (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Photo Credit: Josh Witten (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Photo Credit: Josh Witten (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Yesterday, we featured a lovely Lego sculpture of a running fox by Bangoo H. As one might expect, that was not Bangoo H’s only biologically inspired work. My eye was caught by this depiction of a velociraptor skeleton, which instantly transported me back to Cambridge, UK and the skeleton of the velociraptor’s close relative, Deinonychus, displayed in the Sedgwick Museum.

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Like any museum the Sedgwick Museum had its large, dramatic display pieces. It also had collected items crammed into every conceivable space and drawer (like the fossils of sea urchins in the slide show). There was always too much to take in everything with a single visit. So, each trip involved new discoveries, depending on which cases we chose to explore, which was part of the reason it was a fantastic place to bring our kids over and over again.

Anti-bodies are the best superheroes


HT: David Gorski

Foxy Lego

Turns out “Foxy Lego” totally works as a lyric substitute in the Jimi Hendrix song. Of course, nothing else in the song will make sense, but, really, that is a small price to pay in the face of this fox build by Bangoo H. As I have said before, I find myself particularly compelled by Lego art that represents biology, because both are composed of smaller component parts that individually capture almost none of the essence of the complete thing. I also like sculpture, using any medium, that captures the concept of dynamic motion. This fox checks all those boxes for me.

"Fox" by Bangoo H (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

“Fox” by Bangoo H (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

HT: Brothers Brick

Science Caturday: Coffee Cats in Spaaaaace

 

houston

Coffee’s here! SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft made its rendezvous with the International Space Station yesterday, delivering food, scientific experiments and other supplies, including the first espresso machine in space.

The machine, called ISSPresso, was produced as a joint venture between the Italian coffee company Lavazza, the engineering firm Argotec and the Italian Space Agency. Lavazza, which expects the machine to operate for several years in orbit, will supply the ISS with capsules of coffee year round, so they never run out – a good plan if they want any science to get done up there!

The honor of brewing the first espresso in space will go to Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, who has somehow been surviving on instant coffee until now.

(Our caffeine-deprived space kitty was originally designed by Ben Ducker for British company O2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Analytical Engine, Plan 25

"The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage" by Sydney PaduaMy copy of Sydney Padua’s The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage is supposed to arrive next week (21 April 2015). I’m a little excited. As regular patrons of The Finch & Pea know, I’m just a little bit of a fan of her work*.

Until then (or until the copy you just ordered arrives), you contemplate the complexity and beauty of the completed analytical engine (if only in Padua’s imagination) at The Guardian.  You can also read about the development of the illustration and the choice of color palette at Padua’s own site.

*Mutual appreciation society